I quit my job, with nothing to go to.

Do you know what’s scary? You know that paralysis of fear that you feel right before the drop of a rollercoaster? Or the gut wrenching anxiety when you walk into a hospital? That moment of desperation when you swerve quickly to avoid a fatal collision? We each have our own definitions of fear. For me, losing your job is scary, but what’s worse is staying in your job.

Two weeks ago, I quit my job. What I do is not impressive, and it’s not particularly well paid. In fact, it is minimum wage and it has made me miserable every day for the last 8 months. The sensible thing to do would be to line another job up before quitting, but there’s a moment of content peacefulness that comes when you reach your limit. I knew that enough was enough, and had I not done it then I am not sure I ever would have. Continue reading

Pick me, but I won’t work for free: The expectation of free content.

Image from my own Instagram

Why should you do something for free if you’re good at it? But why shouldn’t you if its all you want to do? Because you have bills to pay and a TV license fee you’re currently pretending is non existent. There’s also this thing called starvation you might want to avoid.

It is a common misconception and assumption that graduates are prepared to (and should do) anything for free, as long as it helps them in the long run. We buy into this with a peppy, pro active and somewhat whimsical attitude. It will look good to employers, we say. A year following my graduation, I can tell you that you should never do anything for free. During your studies, yes. But after you have your degree? No, you’ve done the hard work. Do it for yourself and blog or contribute because you want to, but don’t let someone else gain from what you have done for nothing. Unless it’s The New York Times, there’s always an exception. Continue reading

Class of 2012: One Year On, Two Credit Cards Later

Time flies when you’re having fun. And when you’re sinking into debt. C’est la vie, friends. We are not in it alone. That day was almost a year ago, when we looked ahead with ferocity and a slight naivety towards the job market. Continue reading