Why November 22 still matters.

Image: Bettmann / Corbis / PBS

Note: This is not a political piece and will not concentrate on the details of his presidency – there is time for that later on, this is the story of the haunting tragedy of the loss of a leader.

On November 11, Robert J. Samuelson of The Washington Post claimed that “The fascination with the Kennedys endures, though it’s probably on its last lap. After all, about three-quarters of Americans either weren’t born when Kennedy was shot or were too young (under 5) to grasp what happened. It’s a distant and disconnected event to them.” All historical events are somewhat distant to the current and future generations, how can we be wired to connect to something we didn’t physically experience? In the case of JFK, it is the abhorrent destruction of the idealised and sugar coated American dream that makes the historic event relevant in today’s generation, and it is kept alive by conspiracy theories and the insatiable need for answers and classified information that cannot be given.

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Why do we care what Banksy thinks of the One World Trade Centre?

Image my own.

Street artist Bansky submitted a controversial Op-Ed to The New York Times. It was rejected, due to the newspaper’s inability to agree on the piece or the images used. The piece was then posted as a NYT mockup on Banksy’s own website, among many things he stated that the new One World Trade Centre is evidence that “the terrorists won” and that New York has lost it’s nerve.  New York Times spokesperson Eileen Murphy also told the New York Post that “What he has posted on his site is not exactly the same as what he submitted.”

“It would be easy to view One World Trade Centre as a betrayal of everyone who lost their lives on September 11th, because it so clearly proclaims the terrorists won.”

Letters to Americans – Vladimir Putin’s letter to United States published in The New York Times

Original image property of Telegraph.co.uk

On the evening of September the 11th, The New York Times published a piece written by Vladimir Putin on it’s Op-Ed page. The piece, entitled “A Plea for Caution From Russia” set out to settle a few things that we may have been wondering during the course of the Syria crisis. The Op-Ed has gathered praise from many Americans, claiming that Putin makes more sense and conducts more of an intellectual and cohesive argument than President Barack Obama. It has also been called a gesture of sincerity towards the American nation.

However, it can be seen as a tactical move in Putin’s political operation. It is intelligent, smooth and targeting the American people directly. It’s also in The New York Times, so an implied notion of credibility is attached to it’s publication. By liaising with the American media, especially one such as the Times, Putin looks as if he is taking steps forward in becoming more of a friend to the nation. The whole piece seems rational, calm and a collected chain of well informed thoughts. Continue reading

Pick me, but I won’t work for free: The expectation of free content.

Image from my own Instagram

Why should you do something for free if you’re good at it? But why shouldn’t you if its all you want to do? Because you have bills to pay and a TV license fee you’re currently pretending is non existent. There’s also this thing called starvation you might want to avoid.

It is a common misconception and assumption that graduates are prepared to (and should do) anything for free, as long as it helps them in the long run. We buy into this with a peppy, pro active and somewhat whimsical attitude. It will look good to employers, we say. A year following my graduation, I can tell you that you should never do anything for free. During your studies, yes. But after you have your degree? No, you’ve done the hard work. Do it for yourself and blog or contribute because you want to, but don’t let someone else gain from what you have done for nothing. Unless it’s The New York Times, there’s always an exception. Continue reading

Frankly a little sexist: Taylor Swift vs. Tina Fey

Taylor Swift is one of those young women who people are so adamantly trying to find flaws in, people love to hate her. When Taylor Swift quoted one of Katie Couric’s favourite quotes in response to the Tina Fey and Amy Poehler joke at this year’s Golden Globes she opened herself up to an onslaught of hostility. She discussed the issue in Vanity Fair by saying:

“For a female to write about her feelings, and then be portrayed as some clingy, insane, desperate girlfriend in need of making you marry her and have kids with her, I think that’s taking something that potentially should be celebrated-a woman writing about her feelings in a confessional way-that’s taking it and turning it and twisting it into something that is frankly a little sexist.”
She then continued by repeating a quote that Katie Couric had given her, which was, “There’s a special place in hell for women who don’t help other women.” Continue reading

Relationship Obstacle #1: You

Image by thezartorialist.com, flickr.com

Yes, you. You’re your own worst enemy. Hands up if you know this is true. Now that’s out of the way, we can all have coordinating t-shirts. Mine will say ‘Slightly neurotic but mostly okay’. I personally think it’s charming.

It’s true when people say you have to be comfortable alone before you can be comfortable with someone else. But even the comfiest people fight the most raging of insecurities, nobody wants to lose something that took so long to find.

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Like Wildfire: Why do we gossip so much?

Image courtesy of Rachel’s Secret, flickr.com

I will admit now, I love gossip. Now it’s your turn, admit you love it. Now address why you do it.

We’ve grown up in a generation where gossip has become more important than ever. It keeps web traffic alive on TMZ, it put bloggers like Perez Hilton on our radar, and it started shows like Gossip Girl, casting a spotlight on our obsessions with each other’s lives. More importantly, our obsessions with seeing people we love and equally the people we hate, fall off the pedestal we’ve built for them. Continue reading